A very good year? Scientists find world's oldest wine

Tuesday, 14 November 2017, 11:33:40 AM. The oldest evidence of winemaking to date has been found at an archeological site in Georgia from the end of the Stone Age excavated by Georgian and Canadian researchers.
Scientists say the oldest evidence of winemaking to date has been found at an archeological site in Georgia from the end of the Stone Age. Residues found in six jars at two ancient village sites dating back to between 5400 to 5000 BC show the chemical signature of wine, reports a team led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, the Georgian National Museum, and the University of Toronto. That makes it 600 to 1,000 years older than evidence of winemaking found in the Zargos Mountains of Iran that had previously been the oldest. (Although evidence of a "grog" made of fermented grapes, hawthorne berries, honey and rice beer has been found in Jiahu, China, from as far back as 7000 BC.) A Neolithic jar, possibly used for storing wine, from the site of Khramis Didi Gora, sits on display at the Georgian National Museum. It holds about 60 litres. Fragments from the bottom of a similar vessel have tested positive for the chemical signatures of wine — the oldest such evidence in the world. (Judyta Olszewski) The new discovery is exciting for a lot of reasons, says Stephen Batiuk, a senior research associate in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations and the Archeology Centre at the University of Toronto. "If you're talking to a wine enthusiast, they love the idea we can push the history of this beverage so far. Us archeologists, we're interested in the human element of it," he told CBC News in an interview. Batiuk noted that agriculture first started in...Read more
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