Age matters when it comes to screening for cervical cancer

Thursday, 14 September 2017, 12:14:50 AM. Middle-aged women can choose which test to undergo for cervical cancer screening, according to a draft recommendation from an influential group backed by the U.S. government.
Middle-aged women can choose which test to undergo for cervical cancer screening, according to a draft recommendation from an influential group backed by the U.S. government.           Women ages 30 to 65 can choose to receive a Pap test every three years or a human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The group didn't previously recommend HPV testing without a Pap test.           "Women and providers should continue to recognize that cervical cancer is a serious disease that can be prevented," said Dr. Maureen Phipps, a member of the task force.           "Women who can be identified early through screening can have effective treatment for cervical cancer and go on to lead robust lives," said Phipps, who is also chair of obstetrics and gynecology at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.   Cervical cancer was once a leading cause of cancer death for women in the U.S., but the death rate has been cut in half thanks mostly to screening, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). An estimated 1,550 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2017. An estimated 400 will die from it, according to the Canadian Cancer Society. The Canadian Cancer Society says provincial and territorial screening programs use the Pap test to find cervical cancer early and sometimes the HPV test may be used along with it.           The USPSTF last addressed cervical...Read more
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