AP FACT CHECK: No consensus on government-paid health care

Thursday, 14 September 2017, 04:09:25 AM. WASHINGTON (AP) - Americans are not clamoring for single-payer health care, as Sen. Bernie Sanders suggests they are in proposing a plan that would have the government foot most medical bills. He's right that support for the idea has grown and in some polls tops 50 percent. But polls suggest that the prevailing sentiment is ambivalence. Saving money on health insurance holds lots of appeal.
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are not clamoring for single-payer health care, as Sen. Bernie Sanders suggests they are in proposing a plan that would have the government foot most medical bills. He's right that support for the idea has grown and in some polls tops 50 percent. But polls suggest that the prevailing sentiment is ambivalence. Saving money on health insurance holds lots of appeal. Seeing taxes rise to cover those costs may dull the appetite. Sanders' plan, coming out Wednesday, would have the government finance coverage now paid for by a mix of employers, their workers, public plans and people in the individual insurance market. He's not given details of the likely cost or how, exactly, he'd pay for it. A look at the independent Vermont senator's claims about the popularity of a government-financed system and how they compare with surveys of public opinion: —"You mean because the people in this country want to move toward a Medicare-for-all system, that is divisive? I think in a democracy, we should be doing what the American people want." — AP interview Tuesday, when asked about divisions in the Democratic Party over his idea. —"Guaranteeing health care as a right is important to the American people not just from a moral and financial perspective; it also happens to be what the majority of the American people want." — Opinion piece in The New York Times on Wednesday. THE POLLING: It takes a selective use of polling to make that case. Overall, public...Read more
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