Church shooting victims face many obstacles in court

Friday, 10 November 2017, 05:51:42 AM. CHICAGO (AP) - Texas church shooting victims and their families could have a hard time successfully suing the government over the Air Force's failure to submit the gunman's criminal history to the FBI - a step that would have blocked him from legally buying weapons. Relatives of the more than two dozen churchgoers killed in Sunday's attack would face major obstacles, including protections written
CHICAGO (AP) — Texas church shooting victims and their families could have a hard time successfully suing the government over the Air Force's failure to submit the gunman's criminal history to the FBI — a step that would have blocked him from legally buying weapons. Relatives of the more than two dozen churchgoers killed in Sunday's attack would face major obstacles, including protections written into law to shield the military from certain legal action. An easier route might be to seek help from Congress, which could pass a law acknowledging the Air Force's mistake and offering compensation. A look at some of the key issues involved: ___ WHO TO SUE There are just two plausible targets for a lawsuit, legal experts say: Kelley's estate and the Air Force. Suing for Kelley's assets would be an easy legal win. But it is likely to result in payments of no more than a few hundred dollars to each of the families whose loved ones were killed or wounded. Targeting the Air Force means taking on the U.S. government. The United States, not the Air Force, would be named in any lawsuit as the defendant. Lawyers from the Department of Justice would represent the government. At issue would be Devin Patrick Kelly's purchase of the Ruger AR-15 used in the attack. The Air Force did not report his 2012 court-martial for abusing his wife and her child to a federal database used for background checks on gun purchasers. Had that conviction been entered into the database, as required...Read more
Share this

You might also like

Similar