CONCERT REVIEW: U2 raises social consciousness at FedEx Field

Friday, 23 June 2017, 02:48:39 AM. At U2’s FedEx Field show in Landover, Maryland, Tuesday evening, which celebrated the 30th anniversary of “The Joshua Tree,” the band member even smaller in comparison to enormous screens, said to be the largest video monitors ever used in a touring show. But the music remained as larger-than-life as when it first hit the airwaves in 1987.
ANALYSIS/OPINION: U2 has never super flashy — OK, maybe apart from the “Zooropa” days — and for their live shows, it’s always been more about the band being the vehicle through which the message is conveyed. The focus is the bigger picture versus the four individual band members, but set to music. At U2’s FedEx Field show in Landover, Maryland, Tuesday evening, which celebrated the 30th anniversary of “The Joshua Tree,” the band member even smaller in comparison to enormous screens, said to be the largest video monitors ever used in a touring show. But the music remained as larger-than-life as when it first hit the airwaves in 1987. It was this attention to “the bigger picture” that frontman Bono entreated the audience to abide during Tuesday evening’s show: The world is much bigger than yourself, but we are all one in it too. Bono and company have always brought this to the fore on their records, and they turned this axiom into a gorgeous musical piece of live art. One way the band aimed to reach the next level of consciousness was through poetry. Pre-show, all manner of poetry scrolled down the stage screens, from Walt Whitman’s “I Hear America Singing” to Jamila Woods’ “Ghazal for White Hen Pantry.” The band walked out to “Whole of the Moon” by the seminal Scotch-Irish band The Waterboys. The band’s own songs reflect their social consciousness by discussing “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland (“Sunday Bloody Sunday”), Martin Luther King (“Pride”) and even the Madres de...Read more
Share this

You might also like

Similar