Defending sexual assault is never worth it. Really.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017, 02:21:02 PM. Over the past year or so, as our national conversation about sexual harassment and assault has grown from “grab ’em by the p-y” to #MeToo, we’ve witnessed some extraordinary…
As president, John F. Kennedy made sexual advances toward a 19-year-old White House intern named Mimi Beardsley. He pressured her to provide oral sex to other men. Whatever else happened between them, these acts are sexual harassment and coercion, and if Kennedy were alive today, his behavior would disqualify him from public office. It’s entirely appropriate that former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner is serving time in prison for transferring obscene materials to a minor. And given the multiple allegations of sexual misconduct against former president Bill Clinton, the Democratic Party should have gotten him off the campaign trail a long time ago. See? I may be a liberal. But saying these things isn’t so hard. Over the past year or so, as our national conversation about sexual harassment and assault has grown from “grab ’em by the p-y” to #MeToo, we’ve witnessed some extraordinary acts of moral contortionism. After The Washington Post published a video clip of then-candidate Donald Trump bragging about sexually assaulting women, Trump appeared with Clinton’s accusers before a debate in a bizarre attempt to balance the scales (never mind that he was running against Hillary Clinton, not her husband). In the aftermath of The Post’s story about Senate candidate Roy Moore’s alleged pursuit of teenage girls when he was in his 30s, which included an account from a woman who says Moore touched her sexually when she was 14, conservative pundit Ann Coulter raised the specter of...Read more
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