Military strike on North Korea one U.S. option after hydrogen bomb test

Monday, 04 September 2017, 07:30:13 AM. The Trump administration was weighing all options Sunday night, including a retaliatory military strike, in response to North Korea’s test of a powerful hydrogen bomb that Pyongyang claimed could be mounted on an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching the U.S. mainland.
The Trump administration was weighing all options Sunday night, including a retaliatory military strike, in response to North Korea’s test of a powerful hydrogen bomb that Pyongyang claimed could be mounted on an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching the U.S. mainland. The massive underground explosion early Sunday in a bunker south of North Korea’s border with China was Pyongyang’s sixth and by far most powerful nuclear detonation — so powerful that it registered as an earthquake. Nerves were on edge around the world and in Washington, where President Trump called the test “very hostile and dangerous to the United States.” A month after Mr. Trump made international headlines by claiming he would rain “fire and fury like the world has never seen” on North Korea if it continued with such provocations, the president’s response Sunday was notably more tempered — although he made it clear that his administration was seriously considering military retaliation. “We’ll see,” Mr. Trump said when asked by a reporter whether he was planning to attack North Korea. He made the comment as he and first lady Melania Trump departed church in Washington late Sunday morning. After the president met with national security advisers later in the day, Defense Secretary James Mattis issued a statement warning the North Koreans that the U.S. commitments to South Korea and Japan are ironclad. “Any threat to the United States, or its territories, including Guam, or our allies will be...Read more
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