New Whitney Houston documentary portrays her 'painful' life

Sunday, 20 August 2017, 04:07:29 PM. Showtime’s new Whitney Houston documentary is not always fun to watch — and that’s coming from its executive producer.
Showtime’s new Whitney Houston documentary is not always fun to watch — and that’s coming from its executive producer. “An accurate portrayal of her life,” says Vinnie Malhotra, “is unfortunately a painful one.” Premiering Friday at 9 p.m., “Whitney: Can I Be Me” has a darkness that’s mitigated but never vanquished by Houston’s music. Houston’s albums — with songs like “The Greatest Love Of All,” “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me),” “So Emotional” and “How Will I Know” — sold multimillions. The album from the 1992 film “The Bodyguard,” which includes her rendition of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You,” remains the best-selling soundtrack ever. She became a pop music icon, earning an estimated quarter-billion dollars in her lifetime, and “Can I Be Me,” directed by Nick Broomfield, acknowledges all that. From left to right, Whitney Houston, Bobby Brown, Cissy Houston and Robyn Crawford at a pre-Grammy Party in 1994. (RTNBaker/MediaPunch/IPx/AP) Whitney Houston (far right) with her parents, dad John and mom Cissy.  It also suggests “all that” helped create the problems — drugs, alcohol, divorce, ugly headlines and sheer pressure — that paved the path to Feb. 11, 2012, when Houston was found dead in a Beverly Hills hotel bathtub at the age of 48. “Nick shows how Whitney was the victim of a system that many have fallen prey to,” says Malhotra, and that system notably includes becoming the fame-and-fortune ticket for everyone around you, including family. In one of...Read more
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