Odenton family creates bucket list for adopted senior dog, wins $10,000 grant for BARCS

Friday, 01 December 2017, 09:39:54 PM. The Davis family submitted their story about their dog Kaylee to the Petco Foundation’s Holiday Wishes campaign, which resulted in them winning a $10,000 grant for BARCS Thursday at the Petco Store in Halethorpe. The family created a bucket list for Kaylee, their 11-year-old dog with medical issue.

When Melissa Davis and her family went to BARCS in June, her child Raven had an unusual request — to adopt the shelter’s oldest dog.

Enter Kaylee, an 11-year-old American Staffordshire terrier who was brought to the Baltimore animal shelter when her owners could no longer afford the care for her.

“No one wants an old dog. People think that puppies are more energetic. I don’t want them to die in a shelter,” Raven said.

The Odenton family adopted Kaylee despite a slew of medical challenges the dog faced, including early kidney disease, a torn ACL, and thyroid carcinoma. And they quickly set about creating a bucket list to make their dog’s final days special.

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed. The Davis family submitted their story to the Petco Foundation’s Holiday Wishes campaign, which won a $10,000 grant for BARCS on Thursday at the Petco Store in Halethorpe.

  Davis family photo Kaylee, the 11-year-old dog the Davis family adopted from BARCS, poses in front of a Christmas tree. The Davises have created a bucket list for Kaylee. Kaylee, the 11-year-old dog the Davis family adopted from BARCS, poses in front of a Christmas tree. The Davises have created a bucket list for Kaylee. (Davis family photo)

“To be able to give back to BARCS means so much to us because they gave so much to Kaylee,” Davis said.

Kaylee’s story was one of 52 that won grants — ranging from $5,000 to $100,000 — for their respective animal welfare organizations through the Petco Foundation’s annual campaign.

The Davises have set up a bucket list for their dog, which has included everything from having a birthday party at a dog-themed bakery to having picnic in the park.

“She likes wearing costumes and she talks a lot. She’s a really fun dog,” Raven said, adding that the picnic was probably her favorite bucket list activity. “She kept trying to go around chasing squirrels. That was really fun.”

The Davises dipped into their savings and vacation money to provide care for their beloved dog. Davis said her children even offered to give up their trip to Disneyland so money could go to providing a better life for Kaylee.

Adoptable pets at Baltimore-area shelters

Adoptable pets: Here's a collection of a few of the dogs, cats and other critters in the Baltimore area who need homes. 

Between activities, treatments and medicines, the Davis family has spent thousands on Kaylee. But they insist that she’s worth every penny.

“She’s worth it,” Davis said. “I’d never complain about the amount of money we spend on her. We get it all back for the amount of happiness we get back from her.”

Kaylee is also in the running for the “People’s Choice” award portion of the Petco competition, which ends Dec. 20. That prize is $25,000. And Kaylee is currently in first place.

Davis hopes that Kaylee’s ultimate legacy will be changing the public’s perceptions about older dogs.

“People have this idea that senior dogs aren’t worth adopting because of the little time they have left,” she explained. “They are the perfect companion. They are calm. They are fantastic companions. They are worth every penny you put into them. There is something special about an old dog.”

Zurawik: History of TV as teacher of patriarchy CAPTION

There is an irony that must be noted in television’s playing a leading role in making pariahs out of some of its biggest sexual predators lately, while Washington and much of corporate America drag their heels. TV, after all, has been the principal media teacher of patriarchy since its arrival in American homes after World War II. (Ulysses Muñoz, Baltimore Sun video)

There is an irony that must be noted in television’s playing a leading role in making pariahs out of some of its biggest sexual predators lately, while Washington and much of corporate America drag their heels. TV, after all, has been the principal media teacher of patriarchy since its arrival in American homes after World War II. (Ulysses Muñoz, Baltimore Sun video)

Garrison Keillor says he was fired over allegations of inappropriate behavior CAPTION

Garrison Keillor, 75, retired in 2016 as host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” which he began in 1974. (Nov. 29, 2017) (Sign up for our free video newsletter here http://bit.ly/2n6VKPR)

Garrison Keillor, 75, retired in 2016 as host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” which he began in 1974. (Nov. 29, 2017) (Sign up for our free video newsletter here http://bit.ly/2n6VKPR)

john-john.williams@baltsun.com

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