Plaintiff in St. Tammany landowner vs. frog dispute seeks leap to U.S. Supreme Court

Sunday, 16 July 2017, 06:22:42 PM. The dusky gopher frog is an unimpressive-looking little creature: small, shy, covered with warts and facing likely extinction unless its habitat can be expanded.
The dusky gopher frog is an unimpressive-looking little creature: small, shy, covered with warts and facing likely extinction unless its habitat can be expanded. But property rights advocates say the federal government has overstepped in efforts to save the amphibian, and what's really endangered are the rights of anyone in the United States who owns land. The dispute began when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated 1,500 acres of privately owned land in St. Tammany Parish as critical habitat for the species and therefore subject to controls on the land's development. The issue might end up being settled by the U.S. Supreme Court. +2 Case of endangered frog, once native to Louisiana, likely headed to Supreme Court The dusky gopher frog is headed to the Supreme Court. The Fish and Wildlife Service says a network of shallow ponds makes the 1,500-acre tract the only potential breeding ground outside Mississippi for the dusky gopher frogs. But the Pacific Legal Foundation filed a petition last week asking the Supreme Court to review the decision to designate the 1,500 acres as critical habitat. The plaintiffs in the case, Markle Interests LLC, lost at the U.S. District Court level in 2016, although in making his ruling, Judge Martin Feldman called the government's action "remarkably intrusive (and with) all the hallmarks of governmental insensitivity to private property." A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Feldman's decision. Then, in...Read more
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