Roy Moore’s defiant brand can’t protect him now

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 04:06:34 AM. There is something deep about the reality that Roy Moore’s public career wasn’t ended by his earlier defiance of the rule of law but appears likely to be ended by his sexual conduct.
Wes Frazer, Getty ImagesRepublican candidate for U.S. Senate Roy Moore speaks during a Veterans Day event on Saturday in Vestavia Hills, Ala. To anyone who’s been following Roy Moore for the past 15 years, there’s a single question that won’t go away: Why are we here? Given that Moore, as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court defied federal court orders and was removed from office — not once but twice! — it seems astonishing and outrageous that Republican voters chose him as a U.S. Senate candidate, leading to the current wave of sex-related allegations against him. If you sense frustration in my tone, you’re not wrong. The point of a free press is to inform the public about the character and the beliefs of the people they will be voting for. And to me, at least, it has seemed clear since 2003 that Moore is unfit to hold public office. In fact, there is something deep about the reality that Moore’s public career wasn’t ended by his earlier defiance of the rule of law yet now appears likely to be ended by his sexual conduct. The lesson is this: To bring down a politician, it’s not enough to show that he has violated your principles. You have to show that he’s violated his own. To his supporters, Moore’s defiance of the federal courts on issues of church and state and on gay marriage were acts of principled civil disobedience, not dangerous threats to the very notion of legality. In contrast, no one really thinks it’s OK for a 32-year-old man to make sexual advances on a...Read more
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