Trump secrecy moves threaten his 'drain the swamp' pledge

Saturday, 22 April 2017, 01:31:47 AM. WASHINGTON (AP) - The leader of a bipartisan good-government group, Zach Wamp, headed to the White House last week to ask whether President Donald Trump's drain the swamp slogan would ever be more than a throwaway campaign slogan. One of the president's closest aides, Steve Bannon, assured him it's a priority.
WASHINGTON (AP) - The leader of a bipartisan good-government group, Zach Wamp, headed to the White House last week to ask whether President Donald Trump's "drain the swamp" slogan would ever be more than a throwaway campaign slogan. One of the president's closest aides, Steve Bannon, assured him it's a priority. Bannon said he "agrees with the concept that Washington is rigged," said Wamp, a former Republican congressman. "He said he just needs to figure out what to do about it." Yet within 48 hours of the visit, the White House announced the end of an Obama administration practice aimed at greater transparency in government: It would no longer release the names of visitors to the executive mansion. It was another step away from the goal of "drainage," curbing the outsized influence of Washington powerbrokers. Then, a filing this week showed that the president raised a record $107 million for his inauguration, much of it from companies and people who do business with the government. Trump also has brought scores of special-interest players into government. And he has yet to push any proposals to tighten campaign finance or lobbying disclosure rules. Trump's boldest anti-swamp move - a January executive order limiting the lobbying of outgoing officials - has already been undermined by a waiver he granted to at least one departing employee. The administration says it will never share information about when or why it makes those decisions, another change from the Obama...Read more
Share this

You might also like